Writing in Rhyme Tip 1 – Syllables

Standard

SYLLABLES

 

 

 

During the weeks preceding the COMPETITION deadline (14th December) I will be offering tips to wouldbe entrants.

Today’s tip focuses on the strange creature known as the SYLLABLE.

When you google “syllable” here’s what you might find…

A syllable is the sound of a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) that’s created when pronouncing a word.

This definition can be found on a website called How Many Syllables and if you click on the link you can discover how many syllables any word has.

Here’s another explanation taken from a site called Pronunciation Tips.

English words are made up of syllables. Syllables are distinct sounds within a word. All syllables have a vowel sound in them, and usually have a consonant between it and the next syllable. A word may have one, two, three, four, or more syllables. 

In the English language words range from having 1 syllable – 12 syllables (there aren’t many 12 syllable words).

1 syllable – ape

2 syllables – apple

3 syllables – aggravate

4 syllables – absolutely

5 syllables – accumulation

6 syllables – acclimatization

7 syllables – antidiscrimination

8 syllables – autosuggestibility

9 syllables – antiferromagnetically

10 syllables – antidisestablishmentarian

11 syllables – antidisestablishmentarianist

12 syllables – antidisestablishmentarianism

If we were to deconstruct the last (and longest word) to highlight each syllable this is how we might do it.

  an ti dis i stab lish men ta ri an is m
syllable sound a i i i a i e a i a i u
syllable number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

 

Writing in rhyme is a musical business with each line driven by its rhythm.

Each syllable takes up a beat in time and what we will learn tomorrow is that certain syllables take more time than others. This is what determines the meter.

If you have any questions, please post them below in the comments section.

Happy rhyming 🙂

 

 

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